Colloque: “Is Institutional Changes responsible for Economic Decline in Japan? : The Results of Hybridization”

“Is Institutional Changes responsible for Economic Decline in Japan? : The Results of Hybridization”
de Hideaki Miyajima (Waseda University, WIAS and RIETI) et professeur invité à l’EHESS durant le mois de mars 2013.

Le 21 mars 2013 de 19H à 20h30
A l’EHESS, salle 11, 105 Bd Raspail, 75006 Paris

La conférence aura lieu en anglais.
Entrée libre et gratuite mais inscription obligatoire à l’adresse suivante: ffj@ehess.fr

Thème de la conférence:
In the aftermath of the banking crisis in Japan in the 1990s and early 2000s, the Japanese corporate system is undergoing fundamental changes. The traditional J-firm dominated by bank ownership and cross-shareholdings is giving way to something closer to the outsider systems of corporate ownership and control which are observed in other developed countries. In particular, share ownership by foreign institutions is replacing some of the shareholdings that were previously in the hands of banks and corporations. At the same time, many firms are seeking to retain the traditional life-time employment arrangements which characterized the J-firm. This combination of increasing outside ownership and life-time employment remains a distinguishing feature of Japanese firms – the “hybrid structure”. Since hybridization is opposed to the institutional complementarity that is at the core of the varieties of capitalism argument, the natural questions are whether the hybridization is transitional to the Anglo Saxon model, or has stabilized in a new equilibrium, and whether the hybridization is pro- or counter-productive. The purpose of this presentation is to address these questions.

Email: ffj@ehess.fr
Website: http://ffj.ehess.fr/

HMiyajima_FEB13


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search