Séminaire: “The Political Construction of Business Interests: Coordination, Growth, and Equality”

Friday, 15 March 2013

The Political Construction of Business Interests: Coordination, Growth, and Equality

COOPs Seminar MaxPo

Cathie Jo Martin, Boston University
Discussant: Pierre Francois, CSO
H202B, 28 rue des Saints-Pères; 3:00 to 4:30 pm

Cathie Jo Martin is professor of Political Science at Boston University and former chair of the Council for European Studies. Her most recent book, The Political Construction of Business Interests: Coordination, Growth and Equality (co-authored with Duane Swank, Cambridge University Press 2012) investigates the origins of coordinated capitalism and the circumstances under which employers are persuaded to endorse social policies promoting economic productivity and social solidarity. She is also author of Stuck in Neutral: Business and the Politics of Human Capital Investment Policy (Princeton University Press, 2000) and Shifting the Burden: the Struggle over Growth and Corporate Taxation (University of Chicago Press, 1991). She has held fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the University of Copenhagen and received her Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1987.

Pierre Francois is senior researcher at the CNRS (Centre de sociologie des organisations) and professor at the Ecole Polytechnique. For the last decade, he is currently conducting research on contemporary poetry since the 1960s in collaboration with Sébastien Dubois. He is also working on a historical sociology of firms and their managing directors since the beginning of the 19th century, as part of a study he is conducting with Claire Lemercier. His publications include Le monde de la musique ancienne (2005), Sociologie des marchés (2008) and Vie et mort des institutions marchandes (2011).

Link: http://www.maxpo.eu/events-coops.asp


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée.

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search